Pregnancy Care

What we can do for you if you think you are pregnant:

  • Confirm you are pregnant
  • Calculate your estimated date of Delivery (EDD)
  • Explain your options for the management of your pregnancy
  • Offer private combined care (GP/Hospital) and refer you to the Maternity Hospital of your choice
  • Explain antenatal screening options
  • Offer general health and diet advice for pregnancy
  • Explain schedule of visits during pregnancy
  • Discuss vaccines for pregnant women
  • Discuss maternity/paternity benefit
  • Perform an early pregnancy ultrasound

The purpose of the early pregnancy scan is:

  • To confirm location of the pregnancy (Is the baby inside the womb?)
  • To determine fetal viability (Is my baby’s heart beating?)
  • To measure fetal heart rate (How fast is the baby’s heart beat?)
  • To provide accurate gestational dating by crown-rump-length (How far along am I?)
  • To establish an estimated due date (When is my baby due?)
  • To determine number of fetuses (Could I be having twins?)
  • To assess the ovaries and uterus to make sure that they are normal (please note that these structures are not always clear on ultrasound, but we do our best to check them)

This scan cannot:

  • Rule out chromosomal or anatomical abnormalities
  • Assess the final location of the placental as it is too early

When is the best time to go for an Early Pregnancy Scan?

The heartbeat of the embryo can be seen from 6 weeks onward, therefore, the Early Pregnancy Baby Scan can be performed from 6 weeks 0 days – 11 weeks 6 days from the first day of your last menstrual period (LMP).

If your menstrual cycle is longer than 28 days it is advisable to wait until you are at least till 8 weeks from your LMP to confirm the viability of the embryo as you may not be as far as your dates suggest.

How do I prepare for an Early Pregnancy Scan?

You are required to have an adequately full bladder for your early pregnancy scan. There is certainly no need to be uncomfortably full. We suggest that you go about your normal daily routine but just not empty the bladder half an hour before the scan.

There is a small chance that a transvaginal scan may need to be performed in order to get a clearer view. Some patients prefer this method of scanning as the resolution of the image is better, improving the accuracy of the measurements and the clarity of the pictures. Feel free to request this as there is no extra charge.

What to expect from the early pregnancy scan?

During the ultrasound scan we assess the position and shape of the gestational sac. It is important to see the sac within the uterus as this excludes an ectopic pregnancy. We then look for the presence of the embryo or possibly multiple embryos. The heart rate is measured to determine viability. A measurement is then taken from the tip of the head to the little bottom, called the crown rump length (CRL). When performed correctly, this measurement is the most accurate way of dating a pregnancy. Many studies show that this form of dating is more accurate than the first day of the last period or measurements taken at detailed anomaly scan which is carried out at around 20 weeks. We also examine the uterus and ovaries for any pathology such as ovarian cysts or fibroids.

If you decide to stay with us for subsequent pregnancy and postnatal care we also offer:
Harmony tests
  1. What is the Harmony Prenatal Test?
    The Harmony Prenatal Test is classified as a non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT). The test is able to examine the DNA of a fetus, by taking a blood sample from the pregnant mother, when she is least 10 weeks pregnant.

  2. What can the Harmony Prenatal Test assess?
    The Harmony Test is basically done to know if the baby is at risk of developing Down Syndrome (trisomy 21), Edwards Syndrome (trisomy 18) or Patau Syndrome (trisomy 13), which produces numerous birth defects, leading to a possibly fatal outcome. The test can also determine the gender of the baby. This test poses no risk to either the mother or baby.

  3. How accurate is the Harmony Test?
    Compared to previous testing methods (nuchal translucency and maternal serum screening), the Harmony Test has a much higher detection rate for the stated-above syndromes. This test is capable of identifying 99% of all babies with Down syndrome, 97% of the ones with Edwards syndrome, and 92% of the ones with Patau syndrome.

    Besides this, the test has a lower false positive rate than the older ones, which reduces the chances of needing an invasive test that could potentially put the fetus at risk. Regarding the baby´s gender, the Harmony Test has an accuracy rate of 99%.

  4. How is the test performed and processed?
    We will first perform an ultrasound to measure the baby and assess the heartbeat.

    If the patient decides to have the test, she will have to sign a consent form.  The doctor will then draw a small amount of blood from one of her veins, which may cause a mild sensation of discomfort.


    The blood sample will be sent with the patient’s information (name, date of birth, gestational age, etc.) to genetics experts, who will extract cell-free DNA from the blood and apply them to the Harmony Test.

  5. Results – they are usually back in 5-6 working days

Early fetal anatomy ultrasound and nuchal translucency (NT) – 11+0 to 13+6 weeks of pregnancy

Assessment of fetal anatomy is the major component of the 12+ week scan. The following routine fetal anatomy should be assessed as a minimum:

  • Skull and brain
  • Stomach
  • Bladder
  • Spine
  • Four limbs (document two arms, two legs, two hands and two feet)
  • Cord insertion
  • Four-chamber heart (if possible)
  • Nasal bone
  • Nuchal translucency

Nuchal translucency is measurement of the size of the translucent space behind the neck of the fetus using ultrasound at between 10 and 14 weeks of pregnancy, reflecting the amount of fluid that has accumulated under the skin of the fetus. Nuchal translucency tends to be increased in chromosome disorders such as Turner syndrome and Down syndrome. This is strictly a screening test. Combined with fetal nasal bone assessment it can detect up to 64.9% of cases with trisomy 21 and 66.7% of cases with trisomy 18/13.

Gender Determination Scan

More and more parents are inquisitive about the sex of their unborn baby and we are delighted to provide this service to all patients who are keen to find out.

During this scan we:

  • Determine the sex of your baby
  • Assess the location of the pregnancy to make sure that it is the correct place
  • Check that the baby is viable by looking for the heart beat
  • Spine
  • Measure the heart rate of the baby
  • Measure the head, abdomen and femur bone to check for normal fetal growth
  • Identify some of the main organs to make sure that they appear normal for this gestation
  • Look at the amount of amniotic fluid
  • Assess the placenta and umbilical cord vessels.

Please note that this scan cannot exclude all chromosomal or anatomical abnormalities.

When to have a Gender Determination Pregnancy Scan?

We perform gender determination ultrasound after 17 weeks of pregnancy with over 99% accuracy.

Anomaly Ultrasound

18-23 weeks – this is usually performed free of charge in the public hospitals.

However, if your hospital does not provide this service or you miss the appointment, we do:

Fetal Biometry

The following measurements are routinely obtained to calculate estimated fetal weight (EFW) and estimated date of delivery (EDD):

  • Head Circumference (HC)
  • Bi-Parietal Diameter (BPD)
  • Abdominal Circumference (AC)
  • Femur Length (FL)

Second trimester calculation of EDD based on these parameters has a generally accepted error margin of +/- 7 days.

Morphologic assessment

The following structures should be visualized at a routine second trimester morphology ultrasound.

  1. Fetal head
    • fetal skull: integrity and shape
    • fetal brain
    • ventricles and choroid plexus
    • cavum septum pellucidum
    • posterior fossa, including measurements of transcerebellar diameter and cisterna magna
    • nuchal fold thickness
     
  2. Fetal face
    • profile and nasal bone
    • orbits and lenses
    • upper lip
     
  3. Fetal heart and chest
    • fetal heart rate and rhythm
    • cardiac situs
    • four chamber view
    • fetal heart rate
    • diaphragm and lungs
     
  4. Fetal abdomen
    • liver
    • stomach (including situs)
    • kidneys
    • abdominal wall
    • umbilical cord insertion
    • bladder
    • fetal gender
     
  5. Fetal musculoskeletal system
    • spine
    • transverse, longitudinal +/- coronal views and skin line
    • upper limbs
    • humera, including humeral length (HL)
    • radius/ulna: both sides
    • lower limbs
    • femoral length (FL) as part of biometric assessment
    • screen for talipes
    • both feet
     
  6. Ancillary findings
    • fetal lie
    • cervical length
    • placenta
    • site
    • distance to cervix
    • liquor volume
    • umbilical cord including the number of cord vessels

Most public Irish Maternity Hospitals perform two, and sometimes only one ultrasound per pregnancy.

In DF Medical Centre, as part of our pregnancy care we provide, besides the routine blood pressure/urine checks, fetal movements assessment, pregnancy vaccinations, etc.

Growth and fetal wellbeing ultrasound – every two to three weeks

An ultrasound examination in the third trimester is useful for several reasons.

It enables us to see:

  • That the fetal heart is beating
  • The fetal presentation and position
  • The fetal size and growth, we can estimate the fetal weight
  • The volume of amniotic fluid around the baby
  • The position of the placenta
  • The blood flow to the baby through the umbilical cord (Doppler Studies) if necessary
  • The activity and movements of the baby
  • The length of the cervix

Doppler Ultrasound

Doppler ultrasound uses sound waves to detect the movement of blood in vessels. It is used in pregnancy to study blood circulation in the baby, uterus and placenta.

We recommend the use of Doppler ultrasound in obstetrics under the following circumstances:

  1. Suspected intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR),
  2. Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), preeclampsia, eclampsia,
  3. Status post dysmature delivery/intrauterine death,
  4. Status post preeclampsia/eclampsia,
  5. Abnormalities in the recorded fetal heart rate,
  6. Reasonable suspicion of fetal anomalies or fetal disease,
  7. Multiple pregnancy with discordant growth,
  8. Suspicion of cardiac anomalies or heart disease.

3D/4D Ultrasound

The 3D/4D baby scan gives you a unique opportunity to bond with your unborn baby during pregnancy. Time is taken to capture 3D baby scan images and 4D video clips– the fourth dimension is the moving part. We perform all 3D/4D scans using the latest GE Healthcare equipment – global leader in obstetric ultrasound technology.

The purpose of this scan is:

To view your baby in 3d and 4d and capture pictures and videos for you to cherish.

The 2d element of this scan is the full wellbeing check of your baby. This is not the detailed anomaly scan; therefore, we cannot rule out all fetal abnormalities.

When to have a 3D/4D Well Being Pregnancy Scan

The 3D/4D pregnancy scan can be performed from 18-34 weeks. We highly recommend making your booking for when you are between 28-34 weeks pregnant as the pictures are usually the best at this stage.

How to prepare for a 3D/4D Well Being Pregnancy Scan

Make sure that you drink plenty of fluids in the week leading up to your scan. This may help increase the amniotic fluid around the baby allowing for better pictures. Feel free to empty your bladder before the scan. This can move the baby’s head into a better position. You can also have something sweet to eat or drink just before your scan to get the little one moving.

What to expect from a 3D4D Wellbeing Pregnancy Scan?

You will be asked to lie down on the ultrasound examination couch. Some gel will be put on your tummy and an ultrasound probe with be moved over your belly to examine the pregnancy. The baby scan image will come up on a television screen so that you can see your scan live. The presentation of the baby and location of the placenta will be checked. Standard measurements will be taken of the baby’s head, abdomen and femur bone. Some of the main organs that can be seen at this stage will be examined. The baby’s weight can be estimated. Fetal movements and breathing will be surveyed throughout this pregnancy scan. The amniotic fluid volume and placenta location will be checked for normality. Multiple 3D baby scan pictures and 4D clips will be taken of your baby throughout the scan.

Postnatal care

Postnatal Health – The Early Days
Your new baby has finally entered the world. So now what?
  • If you had a normal or assisted delivery you will most likely remain in hospital for one to three days.

  • If you have had a caesarean section, you will most likely remain in hospital for four to five days.

NB; Look after yourself.

Postnatal health for new mothers

Welcome to motherhood!

You will find it both rewarding and demanding caring for your new baby, and it’s all too easy in the excitement to forget about your own health. With everything focusing on the birth, you may not have given much thought to what happens to you afterwards.

Body Changes

Bleeding:

  • Lochia describes the discharge from the womb as its lining is shed following birth. For the first 2-4 days after the birth, the loss will be red and heavy, similar to a period. During the first week, the loss will diminish, becoming more brown or pink in colour. After about 2-3 weeks, the loss becomes creamy brown/clear and eventually stops.

  • If you notice that the loss has an offensive smell, becomes heavier or becomes bright red after the first 4-5 days, tell your midwife or public health nurse so that they can make sure you don’t have an infection.

  • Your next period may start again within the first six weeks, although if you are fully breast-feeding this may be delayed.

After pains:

  • You may feel mild contractions in the first few days after delivery as the uterus shrinks back to its pre-pregnancy size. Painkillers such as paracetamol, (but take care not to exceed the stated dose), may relieve the discomfort.

Perineal Pain:

  • If you have torn the perineum (the area around the vaginal opening) or have had an episiotomy and stitches, you are bound to feel sore and uncomfortable for the first few days. Make sure that you take medication to relieve the soreness.

  • If you have had stitches, these take about two weeks to dissolve. Clean the area after going to the toilet. Avoid constipation and drink plenty of fluids in order to keep your urine dilute and reduce the stinging.

  • Do not use soap, oils or perfumed products in the bath, keep the area clan and dry, and rest a much as possible until the stitches feel more comfortable.

Care after a caesarean:

  • After a Caesarean you may find it takes a little longer to recover your physical health and strength. This is entirely normal.

  • For the first few days, the midwife will examine your wound to ensure that it is healing. Stitches are usually removed on about the fifth day.

  • The main thing to remember is not to over stretch, lift heavy objects, hoover or drive in the first four to six weeks.

Breasts:

  • During the first few days following the birth, your breasts will change as they prepare for feeding. This happens whether or not you intend to breast feed your baby.

  • It is important to wear a well-fitting and supportive bra during this time. You may also feel more comfortable wearing it at night. If you are breast-feeding, you may wish to wear breast pads. These disposable pads fit neatly into your bra and absorb excess milk.

  • Ask your midwife for help with breast-feeding as positioning the baby correctly on the breast is the key to successful breast feeding.

Fatigue:

  • It is normal to feel very tired after having a baby. Ensure that you rest when baby sleeps and don’t try to do too much in the early days. Ask for help from family and friends. You have enough to do looking after your baby without having to look after guests.

Swelling:

  • Your feet and hands might swell after your baby is born. This swelling is due to excess fluid present in the body following delivery and usually goes away within a few days. However, it can be very uncomfortable especially in hot weather.

  • Make sure that you have as much rest as possible and elevate your feet while sitting. This helps relieve the pressure of the fluid in the legs. Remove any tight fitting rings if your fingers swell.

Backache:

  • During pregnancy your balance and posture are affected by the size of your growing uterus. In addition, the hormones of pregnancy soften the muscles and ligaments that support your back.

  • Try not to lift heavy objects for the first few weeks after birth. When you do lift, bend at the knees. Sit well supported and ensure that you are comfortable when feeding your baby.

  • After the first six weeks you will find your muscle tone improves especially if combined with postnatal exercise. If you still suffer backache after six weeks consult your doctor.

Haemorrhoids, varicose veins & constipation:

  • They are all made worse in pregnancy. In the postnatal period, the level of progesterone falls and these problems usually diminish.

  • Eating a well-balanced diet with adequate fibre and fluid will help lessen the discomfort of haemorrhoids and reduce the risk of constipation. Your midwife or pharmacist can advise you about creams that reduce the pain of piles. Make sure you wash thoroughly after each bowel movement to prevent inflammation and soreness. If the problem persists tell your Doctor at your six-week postnatal examination.

  • If you suffer from varicose veins make sure you have plenty of rest with your legs elevated. If you have been wearing support tights in pregnancy you should continue wearing them in the postnatal period, put them on before you get out of bed in the morning. Leg exercises encourage blood flow through the legs.

Skin and Hair changes:

  • During pregnancy some women report that their hair has never been in such good condition, while others say the opposite!

  • In the postnatal period some women notice hair loss. This is usually very mild, use hair products, which are best suited to your hair type and ask your hairdresser’s advice before having a colour or a perm.

  • If you developed stretch marks on your abdomen and thighs and/or a dark line down the centre of your abdomen during pregnancy the will fade once the baby is born. Stretch marks never completely disappear – however, they do fade to a pale, silvery colour and thereafter difficult to see.

Stress Incontinence:

  • Following pregnancy and childbirth, many women experience stress incontinence, which means that the pass urine by accident if they laugh, cough, or if the bladder becomes very full. To help prevent or to improve this situation, exercises to strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor are of utmost importance- your midwife will advise you on these.

  • Drink fluids regularly and empty your bladder frequently. Tell your doctor, midwife or public health nurse if the problem persists.

Relationships

You and your partner:

  • A new baby not only changes your life but that of your partner too.

  • Sometimes it’s easy to forget that in the early days men experience the emotional stresses of parenthood as strongly as mothers do.

  • Make sure that you talk to your partner. Tell him how you feel and ask him how he feels. You both may find caring for your baby hard going initially, so try to support each other.

  • Also, try to have time together without the baby. Ask a Friend or relative to baby sit- even if it is only for a short while.

Sex:

  • There are no rules about when you start having sex, even if you have had stitches. Make love when you feel comfortable but ensure you use contraception if you do not want another baby straight away.

  • If you are tired and sore and don’t want to rush things, find other ways of being close and loving.

  • There is a risk of pregnancy even if you are breast-feeding -so use contraception.

  • For advice on contraception speak to your midwife or doctor.

You and your body:

  • Motherhood means different things to different people. The first few times we all frequently get things ‘wrong’! Don’t worry what everyone seems to say or do. You will soon discover which routines and advice best suit you and your baby’s needs, so give yourself time and space.

     

Healthy living

Diet:

  • Your diet following the birth of your baby should be nourishing and well balanced. Try to eat adequate protein as this is needed for body repair and has an important role in the production of breast milk.

  • Your diet should also have adequate amount of iron to help counteract anaemia. Eat plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables to help relieve constipation and provide a healthy intake of vitamins and minerals.

  • If you are breast-feeding, allow your hunger and thirst to regulate your food and fluid intake. Try to increase your daily intake of oily fish such as mackerel or salmon as they contain long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids thought to be important for infant brain development.

  • Slimming diets should be avoided while breast-feeding.

Exercise:

  • As soon as possible after birth you should start your pelvic floor exercises. Exercise improves muscle tone, promotes healing and aids the drainage of lochia.

  • Increase your exercising each day – gentle exercise in the first six weeks. If you experience any pain while exercising stop and reduce the amount of exercising.

  • Walking is an ideal form of exercise for mum and baby.

Moods and feelings:

  • Giving birth is an emotional experience for any woman and the demands of motherhood combined with the dramatic life changes have a profound effect on how you feel.

  • Don’t expect to feel like an experienced confident and happy mother straight away. Every mother is different, and many find the transition to motherhood difficult especially when sleep is at a premium.

  • Try to get adequate rest and sleep when the baby sleeps. It is quite normal to feel tearful in the first few days. However, if you continue to feel tired, depressed or low, talk to your midwife or public health nurse.

Enjoy your baby!

After giving birth, your health is as important as that of your baby. Take time to adjust to the challenge of motherhood. Always ask for help even if the problem seems small. You and your baby need time to get to know each other and that's best done when you are both in the best possible health!!

  • Many mothers feel very emotional and upset when they have the blues and they cry for no particular reason.
  • They may find that it is impossible to cheer up.
  • Some mothers feel very anxious and tense.
  • Minor problems may cause mothers with the blues to worry a great deal.
  • Some mothers have pains for which there is no medical cause or they may feel unwell but without any particular symptoms.
  • Most mothers who have the blues feel very tired and lethargic most of the time. Frequently they have trouble sleeping.

Possible causes:

  • The blues may have several causes some biological some emotional. When a
    baby is born there are very sudden changes in the mother’s hormone levels.
    Some, required during pregnancy, drop rapidly, while others like those, which
    start the production of milk rise. These rapid changes may act to trigger the
    blues.
  • Many mothers are unprepared for extreme weariness, which often follows a
    birth. The weariness is usually due to a combination of factors. In many cases
    the mother will have been anticipating the birth with some apprehension. This,
    as well as the physical exertion of the birth itself, can make mothers feel
    exhausted.
  • Rest and quiet are most important after a birth. Few mothers get either, as they
    are busy responding to the needs of the baby, or, when they might be able to
    rest, they are disturbed by hospital or home routines or by visitors who may
    stay too long.
  • Sometimes the baby may have a slight health problem such as jaundice or
    feeding difficulties in the early days. These problems are very common with
    new babies, but they cause mothers great anxiety. The problems do settle
    down as the baby gets older and mothers should try to talk to medical staff and
    allow themselves to be reassured that the baby will thrive.
  • Mothers who have the blues should be allowed to cry if they want to and allowed to express their fluctuating emotions.
  • If they feel miserable, they should not be told to pull themselves together.
  • It can be a great help to the mother if someone listens to her and reassures her that her worries and misery will not last and that she will soon feel happier.
  • A mother who has the blues must have as much rest as possible.
  • It may also help the mother if she is told that the blues are very common and that they pass quickly.
  • Affected mothers are often oversensitive about what is said to them by relatives and medical staff. So, tact and empathy from the staff can be
    beneficial at this time.

Length of the Blues:

In most cases only a few days and the feelings fade. If the blues do continue and seem

to be getting worse see your Doctor.

    • Postnatal Depression has many symptoms.
    • Most mothers who have the illness find that they are less able to cope with the demands of the baby and the home.
    • Some mothers feel very despondent. They may feel very sad and cry frequently.
    • Some feel anxious and fearful; they worry about their own health and that of the baby. They may suffer from panic attacks and feel tense and irritable all of the time.
    •  Most Depressed mothers feel tired and lack energy, often they feel unable to concentrate and find even simple tasks are confusing and demand too much energy.
    • Some mothers experience pains for which there is no cause (other than tension and anxiety), many suffer difficulty in sleeping and poor appetite.
    • Many depressed mothers lose interest in sex.
    • A depressed mother may suffer from any or all of these symptoms
      mentioned. Most mothers who have this illness feel guilty that they are not ‘coping’ as well as they feel they should be.
    • If your depression lasts longer than a few days you should discuss your feelings with your Doctor. If possible, take your partner or a friend or relative with you. Before you see the Doctor write a list of all the symptoms that you are suffering from.
    • You should not go on suffering depression in the hope that it will go away. Postnatal depression is a real illness and it can be treated successfully with antidepressant drugs. These drugs are not  addictive. They make the unpleasant symptoms fade until they go completely.
    • After you have seen the doctor, you may find it helpful to talk to an
      understanding and sympathetic member of your family or a friend. If your friend understands that you will recover completely and be your ‘old self’. Again, when you are better, then he or she can be a real source of comfort and reassurance to you during the time of your illness.
    • Your midwife and public health nurse can also give you advice, reassurance and support.
    • It is important to remember that all mothers recover from postnatal depression. As the recovery proceeds, the bad days get fewer and less upsetting and the good days become more numerous. Gradually the bad days disappear completely.
    • Some mothers find it helpful to talk to a mother who has had postnatal depression and recovered, you can always speak to a counsellor about your depression.
  • It can help to rest as much as possible if you are suffering from depression. Although it can be difficult to rest when you have a demanding baby and perhaps other children to care for. You will find that you feel worse if you are over tired.
  • Ask your partner or friend to care for the baby whilst you have a proper rest, preferably in the middle of the day. Try to lie on your bed even if you don’t sleep. A rest in the day often improves sleeping at night for those with sleeping difficulties.
  • Try to eat a small meal or have a hot sweet drink at regular intervals. Many depressed mothers forget to eat and this can make the depression feel worse.
THE BABY BLUES AND POSTNATAL DEPRESSION

One in two women who have just given birth experience the baby blues. This leaflet explains why some women feel emotional after a birth and it offers information and advice about the blues and postnatal depression.

The Baby Blues

After the birth about half the mothers suffer a period of mild depression called the blues. This may last for a few hours or at most for a few days and then it disappears.

Symptoms of the Blues

  • Many mothers feel very emotional and upset when they have the blues and they cry for no particular reason.
  • They may find that it is impossible to cheer up.
  • Some mothers feel very anxious and tense.
  • Minor problems may cause mothers with the blues to worry a great deal.
  • Some mothers have pains for which there is no medical cause or they may feel unwell but without any particular symptoms
  • Most mothers who have the blues feel very tired and lethargic most of the time. Frequently they have trouble sleeping..

Possible causes

  • The blues may have several causes some biological some emotional. When a baby is born there are very sudden changes in the mother’s hormone levels. Some, required during pregnancy, drop rapidly, while others like those, which start the production of milk rise. These rapid changes may act to trigger the blues.
  • Many mothers are unprepared for extreme weariness, which often follows a birth. The weariness is usually due to a combination of factors. In many cases the mother will have been anticipating the birth with some apprehension. This, as well as the physical exertion of the birth itself, can make mothers feel exhausted.
  • Rest and quiet are most important after a birth. Few mothers get either, as they are busy responding to the needs of the baby, or, when they might be able to rest, they are disturbed by hospital or home routines or by visitors who may stay too long.
  • Sometimes the baby may have a slight health problem such as jaundice or feeding difficulties in the early days. These problems are very common with new babies, but they cause mothers great anxiety. The problems do settle down as the baby gets older and mothers should try to talk to medical staff and allow themselves to be reassured that the baby will thrive.

What can be done to help a Blues sufferer?

 

The routine postpartum check is done by your doctor at six weeks but you are welcome to come in any time during this period if you need to.

You baby is also checked at two and six weeks after a term birth.

Remember:

It is essential that you have a postnatal cervical smear if you have not had one within the last 3 years and the ideal time for this is when your baby is three to six months, even if you are still breastfeeding – Don’t forget

We Are Always Glad to Help

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